With doting pet parents setting up profile pages almost as soon as they bring their new pets home, it’s not uncommon nowadays to come across pets racking up huge followings online. In fact, 65 percent of pet owners post their four-legged friends to social media. It just so happens that, for a handful of them, those posts go on to garner thousands of dollars’ worth of monthly revenue as their pets grow from adorable internet distraction to full-blown influencers.

Our studies show that recommendations from micro-influencers are twice as effective as paid advertising. That may be why an increasing number of businesses have added pet influencers to their marketing strategies.

So, as the owner of a pet business, how do you leverage this new crop of micro-influencers to grow your brand?

Where to Find Them

The vast majority of pet influencers live on social media, so hit that direct message button and let their owners know why you should be partnering together. 

But as a small business owner, sometimes it’s about finding inspiration from what’s around you. Do you or someone you know have a pet? While not (yet) famous, having a pet be the face of your brand is a great way to share your story. 

How to Use Them

Why would you reach out to a lovable Pomeranian rather than a seasoned influencer with opposable thumbs? “Human influencers might say something off-brand or that offends. Dogs are on message at all times,” Loni Edwards, owner of pet influencer Chloe and founder of The Dog Agency, told Fast Company. “People like pet content, and there’s higher ability of going viral.”

Now that you understand why you should consider a pet influencer, how do you go about working with them?

#Share the love. Ninety-four percent of pet owners see their pets as a member of the family. With this in mind, Chewy began surprising its customers with commissioned portraits of their pets earlier this year. Chewy also sent out 2 million holiday cards to customers last Christmas. This is the type of personalized service that ends up creating buzz online (along with glowing reviews of your business).

Bring them in-store. Sixty-five percent of stores noticed a correlation between experiential marketing and increased sales. For retailers, bringing in a pet influencer is a great way to engage with consumers. In my past life as an associate working at a pet boutique, the owner would regularly throw “tea parties” — a gathering for her and her top customers’ teacup Yorkies. Those events always boosted sales for the day.

Take up a cause. Go beyond promoting your brand, and bring attention to a pet issue you care about. Pet parents are particularly amenable to this — most are aware of the plight of unwanted or abused animals and are eager to support businesses that want to help.

Why They Work

Animals evoke an instant feeling of happiness. Tap into your customer’s emotional side to drive success without making the shopping journey feel overly transactional. “People have this perception that pets generate fuzzy feelings,” Edwards told Digiday. “Brands are [reaching] out because [pets] make people happy, and they want their ads to make people happy.” 

As Hubba’s millennial retail expert, helping brands connect to the world’s largest consumer demographic is where Dayana Cadet thrives. Her work can be found on Hubba.com and trade publications such as Chain Store Age, Retail Minded and My Total Retail.  


This article originally appeared in the November-December 2017 edition of PETS+.