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7 Tips for Livestreaming Dog Grooming Demos on Instagram

Go live to teach new techniques to fellow groomers or coach clients through simple at-home maintenance.

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WITH ONLINE GROOMING education on the rise, livestreams are becoming more and more common. Whether it’s teaching new techniques to fellow groomers, or coaching clients through some simple at-home maintenance, be sure to make it a success with these tips.

1. Prep your environment.

Make sure your background is plain and not distracting. Check the height of the camera beforehand, making sure it includes you and the animal, but ideally, don’t have the ceiling or floor showing. Have everything in the camera frame neat, tidy and clean (including your grooming table). Charge and lay out all tools and supplies that you will be using in the demo for easy access. The grooming table should be ready at the height you’ve set for your camera, with the arm and loop ready to go.

2. Make light bright and indirect.

I use an overhead light and two spotlights facing my recording space from different angles to ensure there are no shadows. Put your camera on video mode to check to see what the lighting looks like beforehand while you’re moving around.

3. Prep your phone or tablet.

Make sure whatever device you use is fully charged. Turn off any app limits or downtime settings you may have set and turn on “Do Not Disturb,” so the livestream doesn’t shut off or get interrupted. Wipe off your camera lens with a microfiber towel to get a clear picture and put your device on a secure surface so there is no bouncing around (a tripod works great for your phone). Be sure to test the internet connection before you start and do not allow anyone else in the house to use the Wi-Fi while you’re doing your video.

4. Use earbuds.

That way, the microphone is near your face and creates the best sound experience for viewers. Bluetooth headphones are best, but make sure they are fully charged ahead of time and are connected to your device properly.

5. Prep your content.

Your demo dog should be well-behaved and ready to go before you start. Hang a basic script right next to where your camera is placed, so you are looking at the camera while reading it.

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The script should be an outline about what you will talk about including:

  • Introduction: your name, where you’re from, any certifications or associations, etc.
  • All topics you will talk about, in order.
  • Any notes about features of the tools you are using such as the exact name, run times and motor speed.
  • Reminders to reintroduce yourself throughout your demo, every 10 minutes or so.
  • Signoff: Say your name again, and let viewers know how to follow you and any brands you represent on that platform and others.
  • Don’t forget to “share live feed” after you’re done, so the video stays up on the page.

6. Teach your topics as if your audience knows nothing at all about it.

Explain every single thing that you are doing and break it down into smaller, easily digestible sections if possible. Be extremely slow and gentle if you are doing a demo on a dog. All movements look faster and rougher on camera than they are.

7. Most importantly, don’t forget to speak clearly, smile and have fun!

If you can’t think of anything to say during a part of the demo, talk about yourself, your animals, or other things the viewers can relate to. Everyone is there to learn, so do your best!

To see some of my live grooming education, follow chicagogroomer on Instagram.

Valerie Partynski is an Andis Grooming Educator and has been grooming professionally since 2001. Her mother was a pet groomer, so she grew up working in a shop environment, and competed in AKC Junior Handling while learning how to groom. Valerie graduated from Great Lakes Grooming Academy in 2001 and was an instructor for several years while continuing to compete and win several awards including a “Best in Show” and “Best All Around Groomer” in 2010. Valerie was ranked as one of the top 20 groomers in the country in 2013 and has been nominated for many other national awards. Valerie is also canine CPR certified.

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