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Late Designer’s Cat to Become One of World’s Richest Pets

She could inherit part of a fortune valued at between $195 million and $300 million.

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Karl Lagerfeld’s beloved cat, Choupette, has almost 300,000 followers on Instagram.

Choupette, a Birman cat that belonged to the recently deceased Karl Lagerfeld, is likely on the verge of being one of the world’s richest pets.

Before he died, the German designer told Le Figaro, a French magazine, that the cat was an heiress, USA Today reports.

His fortune has been estimated at between $195 million and $300 million.

It’s not known just how much of Lagerfeld’s estate Choupette might inherit.

Lagerfeld died on Feb. 19 at age 85.

The cat is well-known as a social media influencer, with more than 260,000 Instagram follower.

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The wealthiest pet is a German Shepherd named Gunther IV.

He’s worth $375 million, thanks to an inheritance, according to a list compiled by insurance comparison site comparethemarket.com.

Read more at USA Today

Since launching in 2017, PETS+ has won 11 major international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact PETS+'s editors at editor@petsplusmag.com.

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Pet Insurance Firm Says Anti-Vaccination Movement Poses Threat to Animals

The beliefs ‘are spilling over into pet parenting.’

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The anti-vaccination movement has spread to pets, and that could be dangerous, according to Healthy Paws Pet Insurance.

Rob Jackson, CEO of Healthy Paws, told People.com that his company has noticed a decline in dogs getting their “core” vaccinations. That includes vaccines against rabies vaccine, parvovirus, distemper and adenovirus-2.

“Anti-vaccination sentiments are spilling over into pet parenting,” he said.

A blog post on the company’s website states:

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Much like the human anti-vaccination movement, pet parents’ reasons run the gamut, but at the core they all lead back to a belief that vaccinations can be harmful to pets. Some are concerned that vaccines trigger immune disorders and life-threatening side effects, while others think pets can gain immunity much like humans can – through exposure.

The company also noted: “Our pets rely on us to take care and protect them, and vaccinations are one way we can fulfill this promise.”

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Internet Sensation Grumpy Cat Dies At Age 7

She was one of social media’s first pet influencers.

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Grumpy Cat, an internet sensation and pioneer of the pets-as-influencers trend, has died at age 7, CNN reports.

Her owner, Tabatha Bundesen of Morristown, AZ, wrote on Twitter:

Despite care from top professionals, as well as from her very loving family, Grumpy encountered complications from a recent urinary tract infection that unfortunately became too tough for her to overcome. She passed away peacefully on the morning of Tuesday, May 14, at home in the arms of her mommy, Tabatha.

The cat, whose real name was Tardar Sauce, rose to prominence on Reddit in 2012. At the time of her death, Grumpy Cat had 8.5 million fans on Facebook, 2.4 million followers on Instagram and 1.5 million followers on Twitter.

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CNN notes that she also “inspired art projects, perfumes, merchandise, Skechers shoes, comics and even a ‘Grumppuccino’ coffee.”

Grumpy Cat had feline dwarfism, and her owners said that’s likely what caused her distinctive appearance.

Read more at CNN

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Dog Pee Might Be Bad News for Cities — Here’s Why

A study suggests it harms ‘green infrastructure.’

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Dog urine may be undermining cities’ efforts to keep sewer systems from overflowing, a new study suggests.

Cities’ “green infrastructure,” such as street trees, helps to absorb rainwater, Popular Science notes. But these areas also happen to attracts lots of dogs that need to do their business.

And the urine might be making soil in those areas less absorbent because of its low pH and its nitrogen content, according to a study by Columbia University undergraduate and graduate researchers. It also may be causing the soil microbiome to become less diverse.

In areas such as sidewalk tree pits, ““the soils seemed barren, compacted, and the water from rainfall didn’t seem to penetrate very well,” ecologist Krista McGuire, who led the research, said of her reason for starting the project.

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The researchers explained in their paper:

“Our study investigated the effects of canine urine on the urban soil microbial communities in a greenhouse experiment by treating Liriope muscari, a common plant found in New York City green infrastructure, with different concentrations of canine urine for 4 weeks in an experimental setting. We found that urine application significantly decreased total soil microbial biomass and microbial richness, and increased water runoff volume.”

Read more at Popular Science

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