Connect with us

Headlines

Don’t Underestimate the $383M Market for Reptile Products

mm

Published

on

Growth is expected to continue.

(Press Release) ROCKVILLE, MD — The U.S. market for pet reptile products is seeing growth slow but steady growth, according to a new report from market research firm Packaged Facts.

It’s increasing at a pace equal to or greater than the markets for other small pets, such as fish, rabbits, hamsters and birds. It had sales of $383 million in 2016, up 2 percent from the previous year, according to the report, called “Reptile Products: U.S. Pet Market Trends and Opportunities.”

“Growth in the mass merchandiser and internet channels has helped improve overall sales, as have stronger sales in the food segment,” said David Sprinkle, research director for Packaged Facts. “Interestingly, we also see the pet parenting trend extending beyond furry companions to include reptiles. Reptile owners give their pets just as much love as dog and cat owners give theirs. What do these reptile owners want? The same things other pet owners want, namely safe and convenient items that make their pets easier to feed and care for.”

With online sales markedly improving and pet specialty sales remaining stable, Packaged Facts forecasts the reptile products market will continue to grow at a steady rate looking ahead to 2021. Likewise, the strength of the market’s top two segments — food and treats, and enclosure heating and lighting — are expected to sustain sales growth for reptile products.

Packaged Facts found marketer activity involving food and treats to be particularly intriguing due to the rising trend of specialized diets catering to specific species and specific lifestyle stages. While species-specific food has always been more common for reptile pets, more marketers are specifically calling out species in packaging to underscore this fact. And marketers are using packaging to differentiate which food products are appropriate for the specific lifestyle stages of different reptiles and amphibians.

Advertisement

Advertisement

FEATURED VIDEO

Pet Sustainability Coalition

Pet Sustainability Coalition Presents: Critical Sustainability Strategies for Retailers

This webinar, held on November 7, 2019, is the second in a series from PSC discussing how retailers can establish sustainable practices in their business. Moderated by PSC’s Andrea Czobor, the webinar unveils data behind the increasing consumer demand for sustainable products, what retailers have to gain from connecting with these purpose driven consumers, and a new PSC program that makes finding these products easier for retailers.

Promoted Headlines

Headlines

US Pet Food Spending Falls to $28.9B

The segment accounts for 37% of total US pet spending.

mm

Published

on

Pet food spending in the U.S. fell by 7.3 percent in 2018 to $28.85 billion, according to the Pet Business Professor blog.

The $2.27 billion decrease stood in contrast to 2017, when food spending grew by $4.6 billion “due to a deeper market penetration of super premium foods,” the blog’s John Gibbons writes.

A small increase in pet food spending had been anticipated in 2018. The unexpected decrease “was likely due to the reaction to the FDA warning on grain free dog food,” Gibbons explained, noting: “A pattern of over 20 years was broken by 1 statement.”

Pet food spending has been choppy since 1997, with the general pattern being “2 years up then spending goes flat or turns downward for a year,” according to the blog.

Total pet spending in the U.S. climbed by 1.9 percent in 2018 to reach $78.6 billion, according to the blog. The pet food segment accounts for 37 percent of total U.S. pet spending.

 

 

Continue Reading

Headlines

Video: Brave Housecat Fends Off 3 Coyotes

This feline showed moxie.

mm

Published

on

A cat in the Highland Park neighborhood could have been in serious trouble when three coyotes came along.

But Max, who belongs to Maya Gurrin, showed amazing courage, CBS Los Angeles reports.

Max was surrounded, and the coyotes were nipping at him. But Max showed no fear. He even caused one of the coyotes to back away and jump onto a nearby wall.

“He’s always been crazy,” Gurrin said. “Like, if this were to happen with any cat, it would be him.”

The entire scene was captured on security camera.

As tough as Max may be, his owners have nonetheless decided not to let him roam outdoors anymore.

Watch the video:

Continue Reading

Headlines

Dogs May Be More Perceptive Than We Ever Realized, Study Finds

Even untrained strays can read human gestures.

mm

Published

on

Dogs seem to be able to interpret human gestures even when they’ve had no training, a new study has found.

As any dog owner knows, pet canines understand commands and gestures with ease. A group of researchers set out to determine whether these capabilities are innate or require training, according to a report from Frontiers Science News.

The researchers looked specifically at pointing, with Dr. Anindita Bhadra of the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, India, and colleagues studing stray dogs in several Indian cities.

“The researchers approached solitary stray dogs and placed two covered bowls on the ground near them,” Frontieers Science News reports. “A researcher then pointed to one of the two bowls, either momentarily or repeatedly, and recorded whether the dog approached the indicated bowl.”

About 80 percent of participating dogs successfully followed pointing gestures.

Advertisement

“We thought it was quite amazing that the dogs could follow a gesture as abstract as momentary pointing,” Bhadra was quoted saying. “This means that they closely observe the human, whom they are meeting for the first time, and they use their understanding of humans to make a decision. This shows their intelligence and adaptability.”

The research was published in Frontiers in Psychology.

Continue Reading

Most Popular