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Shawna Schuh

Make Your Business Binge-Worthy

How to make your business like a TV series you can’t stop watching

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HAVE YOU EVER BEEN hooked on a television series?

OK, I get that it’s a shameful thing to admit from a successful and seeking business person. Our conscious mind says, “I should be reading a business book, learning how to use social media better, or do the paperwork that’s long overdue.”

But somewhere in our mind, we are compelled to turn on one more episode of this series that is doing really nothing for us but taking up time. We keep doing it because it feels good.

Why we do this may just be the secret to getting people to be that sucked into our business story.

So let’s break this down. People follow:

Interesting characters: That would be you, and those you employ, and those you attract. In your favorite series, you begin to feel for the characters. I say “feel” because sometimes you hate a character too. The secret is this: The characters are interesting.

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Are you being your most interesting self for your customers?

Tip: Those who are interesting are usually interested — asking questions, telling stories, being quick to laugh and having a sense of fun.

Ongoing challenges: Things to overcome that others can feel involved with. When your characters are tackling an obstacle (many times that they created themselves), we love to watch, weigh in and talk about it.

What are you sharing with your customers?

Tip: Share more of your goals and journey with your clients. Let them in on your big plans. The feeling of, “We’re in this together” is a sure way to keep them tuning into you.

Real connecting: Most great storylines show people deeply connected, sharing times, laughter and tears and sacrifices for each other. Day to day seems so much less dramatic than our shows, but it’s only that way if you think it is.

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Do you consider your life like an epic novel?

Tip: Your life is like a novel. Focus on those big and small connecting moments and put as much energy as those you’re watching do.

Cliffhangers: Often, not knowing how it ends is the most tantalizing thing (and sometimes frustrating too!), but we keep watching and giving our time to something that makes us curious.
Businesses do this all the time with sneak previews and hints about new products. Are you doing this enough?

Tip: Give your customers something to look forward to. Either surprises or annual events that are fun and engaging. If you are already doing this, how can you use the techniques from successful series to add more mystery or intrigue?

Next time you watch your favorite show, note what you love most and ask yourself, how can I do this for my pet business?

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Shawna Schuh is a certified speaking professional, an executive coach, master neuro linguistic program- ming practitioner and president of Women in the Pet Industry Network. Email her at shawna@womeninthepetindustry.com.

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Shawna Schuh

What You Believe About Your Customers Influences How You Treat Them

Are buyers liars?

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THE OTHER DAY I caught someone in a lie. It was a little lie, a white lie they call it.

Here’s the definition of a white lie from the Urban Dictionary: “A minor, polite or harmless lie. A white lie can be excused because it doesn’t cause great harm.”

And this is where the slippery slope begins!

What do you believe about lying? Is it totally wrong? Or are little white lies OK since they don’t cause great harm? And what is harm, anyway?

How do you feel about your customers and clients telling you little white lies? Like: “I’m not really looking.” Really? They called or came in, right? Apparently they are at least looking …

Or what about us? If we leave out something that affects someone’s decision, is that harmless?

An example would be a little white lie that there is only a limited number of something, when in reality there are plenty more.

There is a belief that people are not honest when they deal with others, that most people are focused on themselves, on getting the best deal for their needs.

Though there is truth mixed in with most things, today I want you to really think about what you believe about your clients and customers.

The reason is, if we believe buyers are liars, then that will affect how we treat them. With suspicion, with uncertainty and with our guard up.

Shakespeare once wrote, “There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”

And so it is with people.

What if we chose to believe, “People are neither good or bad, but thinking makes it so”?

What if we decided, right this minute, that:

  • All my customers are special.
  • All my clients want attention and guidance, and I know how to deliver it.
  • All of those who inquire about my business and services are looking for what I offer.
  • People are generally good.
  • Pets are the best thing about life (I know you believe this already!).

The bottom line really is: What do you believe about your customers? Answering that truthfully and determining that you will, from this point on, believe only the best will made a profound difference in your results.

If you already have this positive belief, ask yourself whether you are sharing it enough with your team and community. If not, there’s your action plan for this month!

I believe in you!

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Shawna Schuh

3 Leadership Aspects You Need Instead of a Title

Some people naturally step forward to lend a hand and take responsibility.

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SOME PEOPLE TAKE LEADERSHIP, while others are given the title. Think about that in your pet business.

A company hired me to work with its leaders, from the founder — who was a brilliant man who didn’t like titles since he expected everyone to feel ownership — to all the other C-suite leaders who also didn’t have titles.

I adored working with this team. They were innovative, eager to learn and grow, and we saw huge leaps in productivity and profit.

Because the top leader was carrying much of the burden, they hired someone inside their industry to join the team and take some of the responsibilities off his plate. You may have done something similar or said to yourself, “If I could only clone myself, things would be easier!”

The new hire, a man in his middle years of work experience, got a bit sideways with the top guy when he refused him a title. “What am I then?” he asked. To which the founder said, “Worry less about what title you have, and let’s get things done.”

This man — let’s call him Kurt — would not let this go. When we coached, he wanted to spend time second-guessing the founder. When he spoke to others,s he would lament, “If I had more power, I would get more done.” He was missing the entire point that a title doesn’t give someone power. Leadership does.

Several months later, Kurt is no longer on that team. It was painful for everyone since he was liked and respected, but he proved that he couldn’t actually lead (or so he thought) without a title.

Which brings me back to my point: Is leadership given or taken?

Think through this for a moment.

With a title comes what? More responsibility, more power, more money? Or is it your responsibility to lead regardless of those things?

You, like me, have probably been in some sort of group that was given a task, volunteering perhaps or in an association, and there are people who naturally step forward to lend a hand, take responsibility, to encourage and lead, though they were never given that job nor that title.

The others naturally follow, or if the person is a good leader, he works things through together, with everyone sharing and taking turns leading.

You, like me, have no doubt also been in a similar situation where the actual leader was not leading, not encouraging and where things ground to a standstill or much time was wasted.

If you are like me, you might have gently stepped in to sort it out and lend a hand, since that’s what leaders do. Everyone, everywhere, can be a leader. And you don’t need a title to do it.

What you need instead of a title:

  • Ability to see the goal or end result. (You know what needs to be done.)
  • Courage to encourage some type of collaboration. (You can join all the talent together.)
  • Skill in asking questions that bring people forth and safety for them to provide answers.

There are more traits great leaders have, but for today, what if you looked at your pet business and determined whether you have leaders because you’re providing a safe environment or title holders who are working simply because they were placed in that position? Is it time to hire more leaders?

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Shawna Schuh

Assign Tasks with the End Goal in Mind

Ask in a way that will actually produce results.

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THERE ARE MANY TIMES when I hear from my clients these kinds of laments: “I should have said that differently.” Or: “Maybe I used the wrong words …”

When this happens, I’m delighted because that leader is becoming more aware that she has control over those words and how they may or may not land. However, sometimes it’s not the actual words but the intent behind them that makes or breaks the situation.

Let’s dig deeper into this.

Here’s a standard miscommunication:

When you say “Would you please do X task?” your words, in your mind, may be clear and determined.

You are asking them actually to do the task, right?

That’s what you think.

In reality, it’s an inquiry with no clear intent of when it must be complete or even a determination of end result.

When I’m coaching clients, we take it down to the elements that will actually produce results.

First question: What do you want? And let’s go deeper than having the task done. Aren’t tasks the means to an end result? If you are spending a lot of time on “tasks,” you may have a checked-off to-do list and still not have the results you desire.

Ask yourself instead: “What will having this task done accomplish in regard to my big goal or highest priority?”

That question will shift your thinking to shift from “task doing” to “results producing.”

But what do you ask then if not, “Will you do X task?”

You have many choices. and all of them depend on the intent.

Intent one: Get a task completed. To do this, ask it as is with the addition of a timeframe: “Will you do X task by 3 p.m. today?” The specificity will help you both.

Intent two: Get a commitment to a result rather than a task. Say: “To further the goal of X, please provide me with a list of tasks and who is best to accomplish them inside our timeframe.”

This request will allow the other person to take leadership of the goal and either take on the tasks or find those abler to do so. Remember, of course, to include a timeframe.

Intent three: further action on your end goal. Ask a new question: “To make sure we reach X place, what do you think is the best plan or path to accomplish it?”

This will help them buy into the goal and give you new ideas.

As a leader, we usually know the goal and know the steps or actions to take. That doesn’t mean we should do those actions, nor that others know the goal.

When you shift your thinking like this, things in your world begin to improve. I see it all the time in my coaching clients. If you want the same results, the first step is to stop and think, “What is my intent?” and then the words will come easier.

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