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New York to Consider Banning Retail Pet Sales

If passed, the legislation could take effect in 2021.

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Proposed legislation in New York would prohibit the sale of dogs, cats and rabbits in pet stores statewide.

Newsday quoted Assemblywoman Linda Rosenthal, a Democrat from Manhattan, saying the ban would be “a way to protect animals and to try to stop the puppy-mills-to-pet-store pipeline.”

She added that there is “no need to sell animals these days” because “there are so many that can be adopted.”

The American Kennel Club takes a different view. On its website, the organization states: “Throughout the country, animal rights groups are pushing an initiative of local proposals that target retail pet stores as a way to put both dog breeders and retailers out of business.

“Proponents make inflammatory allegations about abuses by breeders (whom they call ‘puppy mills’), and offer a solution that ironically, bans the most regulated and vetted sources (including breeders and handlers subject to federal licensing) while urging the sales or adoption of animals obtained from sources that have little or no regulatory oversight and that are not subject to federal oversight, state consumer protection laws or other guarantees.”

NBC New York reports that is passed, the legislation would take effect in mid-2021. The news station cited Deputy Senate Leader Mike Gianaris saying that Maryland and California have passed similar legislation, as have numerous cities and towns across the country.

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NBC New York quoted Mike Bober, CEO of the Pet Industry Advisory Council, saying the legislation could harm locally owned pet shops while not stopping irresponsible breeders.

Read more at the Newsday

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