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Best of the Best

South Carolina Store Offers Salon Experiences Even a Human Would Love

Thanks to the individualized and relaxing approach, loyal clients keep groomers booked for weeks in advance.

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Some of Dogma and Fetch’s clients — (L-R) Bailey, Gus and Athena, and Lucy — pose for grooming after-photos, which are posted to the store’s Facebook page.

Dogma & Fetch in York, SC operates its grooming shop like a hair salon for humans. Thanks to the individualized and relaxing approach, loyal clients keep groomers booked for weeks in advance.

THE IDEA

Elevate Dog Grooming

When owners Jordan Garrett and Kenny Childress decided to move and expand their 10-year-old pet store in 2012, offering a new type of grooming experience was at the core of their plan.

“There are so many shops that do it the traditional way,” Garrett says, pointing to operations that value quantity over quality, with dogs sitting in cages or mixing with others in a loud waiting area until a groomer gets to them.

At Dogma & Fetch, dogs are there only for as long as it takes to groom them. That, along with the spa-like atmosphere of the shop, which sits back from the main store in a separate building, reduces stress for both the pups and the owners.

“We do have to make a living, but we care more about the dogs than the money,” Garrett says. “Our clients trust that we will treat their pets like they are our own.”

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THE execution

One Dog, One Groomer

When dogs arrive, their groomer — the same one each time, another way Dogma & Fetch makes the experience more relaxing — checks them in and gets to work. Calming music and the smell of lavender fill the air. The only reason a dog would not have total privacy during his groom is if a sibling is waiting his turn.

“A lot of dogs are fearful of going to the groomer, and of other dogs,” Garrett says. “Having them be the only one makes it so much easier on them.”

Toward the end of the appointment, their groomer will call the owner to provide a pick-up time. This ensures that groomed pups will not have to wait in a kennel for long, if at all. Before they do leave, dogs pose for an after-photo, which gets posted to the store’s Facebook page.

THE results

Happy Pups, Happy Customers

Garrett says that grooming sales account for a steady 40 percent of Dogma & Fetch’s bottom line, and that doesn’t take into consideration the shopping happy clients do on their way out the door. The store offers a wide range of pet products, from stimulating toys and stylish clothing to all-natural/organic food and gourmet treats, the latter of which are gathered up on a silver platter before being packaged to take home.

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Dogma & Fetch offers a wide selection of toys and treats for its canine clients.

Do It Yourself: Individualize Your Store’s Approach

  • An existing grooming shop wanting to embrace set appointment times can do so gradually over time or by switching on a certain date. Grooming prices will need to reflect the new individualized approach, but Garrett speaks from experience when he says clients will recognize the value. “They expect more, they get more, and they pay more,” he says. “They see that it’s worth it.”

Pamela Mitchell is the senior editor at PETS+. She works from her home office in Houston, TX, with Spot the senior Boston Terrier as her assistant.

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Best of the Best

Pet Boutique Gets a ‘Scathing’ Yelp Review … and Does Something Beautiful with It

Owner turned a negative into a positive.

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In December 2015, a customer left a one-star review of The Fish & The Bone on Yelp. Her dog had destroyed a plush toy in mere minutes, and the offer of 20 percent off a different toy wasn’t sufficient — she wanted store credit for the full amount.

Owner Kathy Palmer saw in the situation an opportunity not only to examine her toy sales and return policies, but also to learn more about her customers and help homeless dogs.

A customer’s dog destroying a new toy within minutes prompted a negative Yelp review, which led the store to poll all its customers.

THE IDEA

Turn a Negative Into a Positive

The Fish & The Bone has never guaranteed the toys it sells, with the exception of those backed by a manufacturer. Staff members help to match products to chewing power, but they are trained to explain that dogs will be dogs.

“It’s fun for them to take apart toys, especially soft squeaky ones. They’re driven to,” Palmer says. No soft toy can stand up to all of that energy and muscle and teeth and instinct.”

She felt the 20-percent discount was a reasonable compromise and was surprised to see the review, which knocked the store’s customer service and said that a big-box chain would have given full credit to ensure future business.

Palmer decided to create a survey on toys, one with a charitable element. She emailed it to her 10,000-plus customers with the subject line: “Read our Scathing Yelp Review, Take our Poll, and We’ll Donate 100 Dog Toys to Local Homeless Pups.”

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“We have to be bold sometimes. It was about more than this one customer. I felt like we were entering into unlimited returns territory, which doesn’t work for a little independent. I had more to say and more to learn.”

THE EXECUTION

Poll the People

Palmer came up with questions to help her understand customer expectations when it came to squeaky toys. She used Survey Monkey to ask their dog’s breed, sex and age, as well as which brands they find most durable, how long they expect squeaky toys to last, how long the toys actually last, and whether toys should be guaranteed.

THE RESULTS

Learn and Adapt Accordingly

A total of 245 customers took the survey, and her stores got a boost in positive Yelp reviews, by shoppers who wanted to counteract the negative one.

Results confirmed that customers like the brands she carries and consider them durable. They also supported her curent policy.

“When I asked if squeaky toys should have a guarantee, 90 percent said, ‘No.’”

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Palmer shared results with her staff and stressed the importance of providing accurate information when selling these products. She also empowered them to make exceptions to the policy.

“We drilled into everyone how to respond when asked if a toy is indestructible. The answer is, ‘No, but we do have some that stand up better than others. Let me show you those.’ If we fail to do that, we will take responsibility and make a one-time exchange.”

Perhaps the biggest positive to come from the negative Yelp review was the donation made. The Fish & The Bone split the 100 toys between Animal Rescue League of Boston and Animal Refuge League of Greater Portland, ME. Per the customer’s request, she also donated $50 to Northeast Animal Shelter in Salem, MA.

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Best of the Best

Tiny Bubbles: This Spa Brings In $1,000 a Month Extra with Micro Bubble Treatments

Provide relief, reduce costs and boost sales.

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BUBBLE BATHS PAMPER and relax. Microbubble baths do, too, but they also deep clean and help to treat a variety of skin problems in pets.

Danielle Wilson of Bath & Biscuits in Granville, OH, has been providing this type of hydrotherapy for more than three years.

THE IDEA

Provide relief, reduce costs and boost sales. Wilson learned of microbubble bathing systems at a pet industry trade show. Originating in Japan, they use bubbles greater than 2 and less than 25 micrometers to penetrate hair follicles and skin pores. These teeny tiny bubbles attract and bond with dirt as well as with bacteria, yeast and allergens, and lift them to the water’s surface. Oxygen from burst microbubbles also boosts skin metabolism and promotes healing.

“I really liked the idea,” she says. “I was a vet tech for many years and had seen never-ending battles with skin problems.”

Using microbubbles during a groom also reduces the amount of water, shampoo and conditioner needed. All this, combined with her ability to offer 15-minute treatments as an add-on, convinced Wilson to buy a system.

THE EXECUTION

Pick, promote & treat. Wilson researched manufacturers from around the world before choosing NatureBless in Singapore. Her first microbubble bathing system cost just $350, but a year later she upgraded to a $1,100 model. Its bubble-generating unit sits on the floor, connected to two nozzled hoses: One draws in water from a filled grooming tub, and the other returns microbubbly water to the tub. The second hose can also be used to apply bubbles to body areas not submerged.

“The microbubbles make the water this milky color, from the churning action. I tell customers that they’re scrubbing bubbles,” Wilson explains, adding that while effective, they are gentle on skin.

In addition to promoting the treatment for skin problems, she also recommends it for senior dogs.

“The bursting bubbles create heat, which helps with sore muscles and arthritis.”

And for those who encounter a skunk: “It has been tremendous for de-skunking dogs. It gets down in hair shafts and pores, helping us get rid of the smell so much quicker.”

THE RESULTS

Healthier dogs & higher revenue. Wilson points to late Sweetpea the Bulldog as one of her microbubble bathing successes. After years of struggling with skin allergies, the pup came in for a treatment and saw immediate relief.

“Sweetpea was such a happier dog, not having to stop every 2 feet to scratch,” she says. “It was devastating to lose her, but really cool to know that for the last year and a half of her life, she wasn’t miserable and itching.”

Wilson charges $10 to $15, depending on size of dog, for a microbubble bath. (She has yet to try it on cats.) Treatments bring in $1,000 in extra revenue a month, plus provide savings on utilities and bathing supplies.

Do It Yourself: Start Your Own Bubble Treatments

  • Choose the right microbubble bathing system for your business. They can range greatly in cost, to upwards of $10,000.
  • Start by offering the treatment for free. Wilson benefited from positive word of mouth when she did.
  • Promote regular and seasonal benefits, from skin problems to allergies to skunkings.
  • Sell local veterinarians benefits on the treatment. Wilson has one in particular who regularly sends her clients.
  • Promote on social media with cute videos. See instagram.com/bathnbiscuits for Sweetpea bubbling in a tub.

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Best of the Best

Up the Convenience Factor With a Drive-Thru Window

Baby in the car. Heavy bags. Short on time.

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THESE AND OTHER REASONS inspired Laura Amiton to open The Filling Station, a pet-supply store in Tigard, OR, with a convenient drive-thru. She came up with the idea one day at her other business, Healthy Pets Northwest in Portland.

“I had a woman running through the store, trying to get things quickly,” Amiton recalls. Turns out, the customer had left her baby locked in the car. “I said, ‘Why don’t you go back outside. I’ll ring up your order and bring it to you.’”

THE IDEA

Increase Convenience

Once back in side, Amiton says, “It hit me like a ton of bricks: Why isn’t there a pet store with a drive-thru option?”

She opened exactly that in 2015. Located in a shopping center space once occupied by a bank, a sensor sounds when a vehicle pulls up to the window. Customers can call ahead with an order or place it there. Employees take purchases out through adjacent double doors for quick and easy loading.

“It can be super fast, take just a couple of minutes. Or a bit longer if they have a lot of questions.”

Drive-thru attendants keep stickers on hand for kids in tow. They even wash windows as part of The Filling Station experience.

“We try to remind people of the old service stations. I believe in old-fashioned customer service. That’s not something they can get at the big pet stores.”

THE EXECUTION

Find the Perfect Space

Buildings with a drive-thru — already in short supply — don’t last long on the rental market.

“Starbucks does a good job of snatching them up,” Amiton explains. “This space had been sitting vacant for eight years because it lost zoning for the drive-thru.

Officials deemed it too short for a busy business, as cars would back up and block parking spots. She asked the highly motivated landlord if there was any way they could bring the drive-thru back. There was: He would present it as a pick-up window that sees significantly less traffic than a bank or coffee shop. The city approved.

Amiton then built out her pet-supply store, positioning the register area next to the window so it would always be staffed, with fulfillment help on standby.

THE RESULTS

More Food Customers

The Filling Station specializes in natural pet foods, which make up 80 percent of its sales. The drive-thru ups the convenience factor while still providing expert advice and stellar customer service. This winning combination helps the store attract highly valued food buyers.

“About 95 percent of my drive-thru sales include food,” Amiton says, who expects that number to grow when she adds online ordering. “There may be add-on sales, but the main reason someone uses the drive-thru is to pick up food.”

Those shoppers remain loyal, as well, even when they may be tempted to order from an online pet retailer and have it delivered to their door.

“Today I had a regular customer tell me how much she appreciated the drive-thru last summer, when she injured her back. She usually comes inside, but used the drive-thru when she really needed it. I hear that a lot.”


Formerly a bank, The Filling Station received special permission to continue use of the drive-thru.

 

Do It Yourself: Open A Store With A Drive-Thru

  • Opening a new store? Work with a commercial Realtor to help you snag a building with drive-thru.
  • Design a checkout area that serves customers both inside and out.
  • Staff accordingly on busy days, with team members greeting all cars in line and starting their orders.
  • Post drive-thru photos to your store’s social media — show a variety, from parents with kids to busy professionals to regulars with their pups.
  • Talk up the convenience to in-store shoppers; drive-thru pet stores aren’t common, so they may need convincing.

 

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