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The Recipient of a Fundraiser Disputes the Sum Raised by a Business and Suggests the Non Profit Is Owed $500 More

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DYANNA WAS FINALIZING the figures of the recent Doggie Festival fundraiser she hosted for a nonprofit that works with their city’s shelter.

This was Dyanna’s first event held at her dog-training facility. The spring weather was perfect, as their event had both indoor and outdoor festivities. Outside, they hosted a hilarious Dachshund race and beginner’s agility tryout in the grassy area of her training center. Inside, there were vendors, training demos, a veterinarian providing dog health care tips, a pet portrait artist and adoptable dogs from the shelter.

ABOUT REAL DEAL

Real Deal is a fictional scenario designed to read like real-life business events. The businesses and people mentioned in this story should not be confused with actual pet businesses and people.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nancy E. Hassel is founder and president of American Pet Professionals (APP), an award-winning networking and educational organization dedicated to helping pet entrepreneurs, businesses and animal rescues to grow, work together and unite the pet industry. Contact her at . nancy@americanpetprofessionals.com

Dyanna, her employees and trainers were thrilled with the success of the event. They had 200 people and dogs show up, and all of their vendors said they would be back for the next event.

They raised $2,000 for the nonprofit, which Dyanna knew would be put to good use for the dogs at the shelter. Her costs to promote the event, food and refreshments, rentals chairs and tables, supplies, paying her employees and trainers added up to just under $3,500. A few monetary sponsors and vendor fees helped offset that, and her total outlay ended up at $1,500.

“Even though our costs were a bit more, I know we already landed new clients and potential new clients from this one event. But what really makes me happy is that we raised so much for the rescue and shelter,” Dyanna said to her manager, Susan.

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Susan just finished double-checking the numbers, since they wanted to be accurate before writing the check.

“Keeping the cost at $10 per person really worked, raising $2,000 for the rescue,” Susan said. “I got the same figures you did.”

Susan handed Dyanna the calculator and paperwork. “I think it is safe to say we can contact Rosa and let her know she can come pick up the check for her org.”

“Remember, we want to take a picture of us handing it to her, so we can send to the local papers and pet bloggers that were here,” Dyanna said. “And since this was our first event, I think next year we can be even bigger and raise more for them!”

A few days later, Rosa stopped by to pick up the check, and they all took pictures. Rosa was very grateful and thanked them over and over in person.

About two weeks later, Dyanna was checking her email and yelled out: “Susan! You have to come in here and read this … I am … I am dumbfounded!”

“I’m coming, I’m coming! What is it?” Susan said, out of breath. She read the email, “Wait, let me see that!” She grabbed the laptop and read aloud:

“Dyanna, I wanted to thank you again so much for all you did for our organization and for the donation. I really don’t know how to say this, but according to your calculations you said 200 people were there, which is where you came up with the $2,000, but our volunteers counted that 250 people were there. Wouldn’t that then equal $2,500 for us? You said the door fee went to us, is that correct? Maybe we can all go over the expenses again together, I know you showed me the other day, but I didn’t get to really digest it all.

“Looking forward to your response. Rosa”

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“What? What is she talking about? I am at a loss for words!” Susan exclaimed as she shook her head at Dyanna, “The nerve!”

“How do I … What do I do? We worked so hard to make this a great event and gave them $2,000! I don’t even know how to … to respond to this,” Dyanna said, as her hands trembled.

The Big Questions

  • How should Dyanna respond to Rosa’s email?
  • What is the best way to handle a situation like this to keep both parties on friendly terms?

Expanded Real Deal Responses

Karen C.Delavan, WI

We’ve done our share of fundraising, and one thing that is a must is to have procedures in place for all aspects of the event. I can see where it would be very easy for a head count to be off: Were staff and volunteers there who didn’t pay the door fee? Were there free tickets to the event that would increase the head count but not the total collected? Simple things like wristbands can help identify who paid and who didn’t. Having great communication between the host and the organization — before, during and after — is critical. To have a misunderstanding can tarnish the good intentions of the event and hurt the future of the relationship.

Wendy T.Moore, OK

My first thought was that if it was a gated event, then the count would have been correct. Maybe the volunteers over-counted if they were just counting the crowd? And if that is the amount collected, then there shouldn’t be a question. If I were to respond, I think I would kindly review the numbers, stating that according to our records, these are the numbers from the event, this is how much was collected, and this is the reason why the check amount was what it was. Absolutely do not get defensive, but be factual and state what a pleasure it was to work with them.

Krista L.Wolcott & West Hartford, CT

I had a similar experience too! Couldn’t believe that the nonprofit would look a gift horse in the mouth! I was exhausted from the work and the expense to have it, but proud and excited for the positive response. Giving back to the community is a necessity for any successful business. From their point of view, I think that they have every right to ask for validation. But there are plenty out there that need the help and would be appreciative of ANY amount raised. Not all nonprofits are the same! To prove integrity and correct any errors, be transparent and cross-reference their info with yours. What their people said may not be the correct count. Was it per dog? Per person? There’s a difference that they may not be clear on. Keep record of all attendees, (proof of vaccines were required) then share that list with the person to confirm the amount. Show them your expenses too! Don’t let it keep you from future fundraising efforts.

Alan F.Sag Harbor, NY

Don’t answer from a defensive position. If you become adversarial, you might end up undoing the good and might even have a negative light on the event and in the community. Double-check how you did your count, then ask to meet with them to reconcile the counts. Do not get into any discussions by email, text or phone. I don’t know how well you know the shelter, but I would ask around to see if anything like this ever happened before. In 15 years of doing events like this, the shelters never questioned what we raised.

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Janice A.Bakersfield, CA

If this is how the organization operates, I would think twice about doing another fundraiser for them.

James W.West Palm Beach, FL

Dyanna and Susan should go over the figures once more with fresh eyes and make sure there isn’t something they overlooked. Assuming that everything again checks out, reply to Rosa: “Rosa, What a great event! We met our goals and successfully collected a $10 door fee from 200 people, totaling $2,000. Dyanna.” That is all I would say. The goal is to deescalate the situation and wrap this up ASAP. There are many worthy nonprofits. Depending on how Rosa answers and how Dyanna and Susan feel about her asking for additional funds (assuming they didn’t make a mistake), they may want to assist a different nonprofit the following year. I would move on.

Kimberly B.Salem, MA

First, take a day to cool off, so there is no emotional content to the response. Then, send the email acknowledging Rosa’s concerns, but also being direct in that her numbers were 200, and not 250. Follow that with a sentence reviewing how happy she was to sponsor the event and raise the money for such a great cause, and looks forward to doing it again. Finally, the email should end by requesting a meeting, so Dyanna can present her data to Rosa. This would help to ensure friendly terms continue. Too many emails back and forth can lead to misunderstandings. At the end of the meeting, they may agree to disagree at the final number and develop joint plans on how to best work jointly in the future to ensure this disagreement does not happen again.

Christine D.Dedham, MA

The only true count on the day comes from when the visitors were checked in initially. You had that “count”. Any “volunteers” sent by the shelter would have been too busy “volunteering” to carefully count each person only once. They also did not know how many “volunteers” (who should not be counted) you had on site to work this event, too.

Perhaps they also counted the vendors. It is a sad tribute to our times that people look to find fault with things and then think they can “email” something that sends a knife through your heart. I feel your pain in having to deal with this person.

Even recounting to this person all of the above will not totally make her happy.

Good luck to you from someone who thought she had seen it all after 40 plus years in my own pet related business. I love my business but occasionally something happens that just makes me sad. Your experience is one of those times.

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Nancy E. Hassel is founder and president of American Pet Professionals (APP), an award-winning networking and educational organization dedicated to helping pet entrepreneurs, businesses and animal rescues to grow, work together and unite the pet industry. Contact her at nancy@americanpetprofessionals.com.

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