Connect with us

Headlines

What E-Commerce Means for the $27B Pet Food Market

It faces ‘enormous headwinds.’

mm

Published

on

The $27 billion U.S. retail sales of dog and cat food market continues to grow, but it’s facing “enormous headwinds,” according to market research firm Packaged Facts.

“For pet food, retail, marketing, and new product initiatives are hopping,” says David Sprinkle, research director for Packaged Facts. “And from a merger and acquisition perspective, the past couple of years have been nothing short of dynamic.”

Podcast: How to Keep Your Millennial Employees Happy at Work
Behind the Pages

Podcast: How to Keep Your Millennial Employees Happy at Work

Podcast: How Pet Business Professionals Can Get More From Social Media Platforms
Podcasts

Podcast: How Pet Business Professionals Can Get More From Social Media Platforms

Podcast: Learn How to Create a Killer Website in Our Debut Episode of “Behind the Pages”
Podcasts

Podcast: Learn How to Create a Killer Website in Our Debut Episode of “Behind the Pages”

But as in almost every consumer product category, e-commerce continues to upend traditional retail as more pet owners opt to buy their pet food online instead of, or in addition to, from brick-and-mortar sellers. That’s one finding from the new Packaged Facts report Pet Food in the U.S., 14th Edition.

For pet food, a side effect has been to speed up the dissolution of the pet specialty/mass channel divide that has long helped to justify the “superpremium” prices of brands sold only by pet specialty retailers, according to Packaged Facts.

Specialty retailers have for years bolstered dollar sales absent volume growth by converting pet owners to higher-priced fare. At the core of the premiumization trend have been natural products, including grain-free formulas, which have driven pet food sales growth for over a decade.

Now, however, virtually all pet food brands are available online, accelerating the “mass premiumization” trend whereby pet-specialty-type products are now widely available in the grocery and mass channels, Packaged Facts notes.

Advertisement

As online sellers including Amazon, Chewy, and Walmart battle it out, including via private labels, the upshot is downward pricing pressure market-wide even as the costs of producing pet food continue to rise.

Since the dog and cat population is not growing enough to provide much of a volume lift, pet food marketers and retailers will have to come up with new and compelling premiumization drivers in order to maintain dollar sales gains, according to the report.

Since launching in 2017, PETS+ has won 11 major international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact PETS+'s editors at editor@petsplusmag.com.

Advertisement

FEATURED VIDEO

JIM ACKERMAN

Very Few Pet Businesses Do This With Their Ads … But You Definitely Should

Testing and tracking your ads can make a huge difference in the ROI that you get, says marketing specialist Jim Ackerman. But very few pet businesses take the proper steps to run successful ad campaigns. Here, Ackerman shows an example of what effective testing looks like.

Promoted Headlines

Headlines

Pizzeria Helps Reunite Missing Pets With Owners

The effort is a hit with patrons.

mm

Published

on

Angelo’s Pizza in Matawan, NJ, has launched an effort to get missing pets back with their owners.

It’s putting missing-pets posters on its pizza boxes, the New York Post reports.

The restaurant recently posted on Facebook: “Anyone in the Matawan/Aberdeen area who has a missing pet can drop off flyers for us to place on all your pizza boxes. No charge.”

In a later post, the restaurant wrote: “Thank you for your support and responses from all of you! This initiative has been very very successful and has raised a lot of awareness for missing pets. Thank you everyone! Let’s all keep helping pets be reunited with their families!”

The initiative has been popular with customers. One commented on the restaurant’s Facebook page: “It’s wonderful when businesses care about animals and their patrons.”

Read more at the New York Post

Continue Reading

Headlines

25 Cities Honored for Pet-Friendliness

The certification was created by Mars Petcare and experts from the Civic Design Center.

mm

Published

on

FRANKLIN, TN — Twenty-five cities throughout North America have landed on the inaugural list of Better City for Pets certified cities.

The certification “honors the work that has been done to create a friendly environment for two- and four-legged citizens and the commitment from each of these cities to continue improving their pet-friendly programs and policies,” according to a press release from Mars Petcare.

Podcast: How to Keep Your Millennial Employees Happy at Work
Behind the Pages

Podcast: How to Keep Your Millennial Employees Happy at Work

Podcast: How Pet Business Professionals Can Get More From Social Media Platforms
Podcasts

Podcast: How Pet Business Professionals Can Get More From Social Media Platforms

Podcast: Learn How to Create a Killer Website in Our Debut Episode of “Behind the Pages”
Podcasts

Podcast: Learn How to Create a Killer Website in Our Debut Episode of “Behind the Pages”

Mars Petcare and experts from the Civic Design Center created the certification as an extension of the Mars Petcare Better Cities for Pets program. The program works with local governments, businesses and non-profits to provide resources, tools and grants that help communities make pets more welcome.

“On behalf of Mars Petcare, I want to thank and congratulate the 25 cities that have prioritized people and pets in their communities,” said Mark Johnson, president of Mars Petcare North America. “From helping people live healthier lives to creating social connections, pets can truly transform our communities. These certified cities are helping to make a more pet-friendly world and we hope that many more cities will join us in this commitment.”

The following cities share the honor of being the first to achieve the Better City for Pets certification:

  • Bloomington, IN
  • Nashville, TN
  • Calumet City, IL
  • Oakland, CA
  • Cleveland, OH
  • Plano, TX
  • Dallas, TX
  • Port St. Lucie, FL
  • Fort Wayne, IN
  • Reno, NV
  • Franklin, TN
  • Rochester, MI
  • Hallandale Beach, FL
  • Royalton, MN
  • Henderson, NN
  • Santa Clarita, CA
  • Laguna Niguel, CA
  • Southport, NC
  • Meaford, Ontario
  • St. Petersburg, FL
  • Memphis, TN
  • Topeka, KS
  • Miami Lakes, FL
  • Tucson, AZ
  • Miami, FL

Through an online assessment at BetterCitiesForPets.com, participating cities were asked to share data on existing and future pet-friendly features within three sections: city profile, survey and priorities. Cities were then evaluated based on 12 traits of pet-friendly cities across the areas of businesses, parks, shelters and homes. Cities that met the certification criteria and committed to continuing their progress in creating a welcoming community for people and pets received the Better City for Pets certification. All cities that completed the assessment received a personalized report outlining their strengths and areas of opportunity, along with resources and tools from the Better Cities for Pets program to help them on their pet-friendly journey.

Continue Reading

Headlines

Here Are the Most (and Least) Expensive Cities to Own a Pet

6 of the most expensive cities to own a pet are in California.

mm

Published

on

GOBankingRates has released rankings of the “most and least expensive cities in the U.S. to own a cat or dog.”

The top-10 lists are based on the cost of pet day care, pet insurance and overall cost of living. (To compile its ranking, GOBankingRates evaluated the 50 largest cities in the U.S.)

The most expensive city to own a pet, according to GOBankingRates, is San Jose, CA. The city has an average cost of pet day care of $40 and average insurance cost per month of $42.

San Francisco is the second most expensive city, with an average cost of pet day care of $36 and average insurance cost per month of $42.

In fact, the study suggests that six of the most expensive cities to own a pet are in California.

Out of the 50 cities, the city named “least expensive” to own a pet is Indianapolis, where the average cost of pet day care is $19, the average insurance cost per month is $31.50 and the general cost of living is comparatively low, according to the ranking.

Wichita is second on the “least expensive list,” with an average cost of pet day care of $22.67, an average insurance cost per month of $29.50 and a low overall cost of living.

Read more at GOBanking Rates

 

Continue Reading

Most Popular