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When Outside Consultants Disagree on a Business’s Future Path, What’s a New Store Owner to Do?

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AMELIA WAS A PET SITTER for a few years and had dreamed of opening an all-in-one place to serve different needs for dog owners. She decided to bring on a team of outside consultants before the opening and was lucky enough to have some investors to help her get started.

ABOUT REAL DEAL

Real Deal is a fictional scenario designed to read like real-life business events. The businesses and people mentioned in this story should not be confused with actual pet businesses and people.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nancy E. Hassel is founder and president of American Pet Professionals (APP), an award-winning networking and educational organization dedicated to helping pet entrepreneurs, businesses and animal rescues to grow, work together and unite the pet industry. Contact her at . nancy@americanpetprofessionals.com

Two months before opening, on a chilly evening in Asheville, NC, Amelia set up a dinner event for her team of consultants and investors to meet to go over her plan for the business.

“Thank you all for taking the time to be here tonight to get Doggie Destination started!” Amelia said excitedly to her crowd, and a lot of whoops and cheers came from the table.

Her team consisted of a marketing coordinator, Margaret; her biggest investor, Mark; as well as a dog trainer; a public relations consultant; and a retired pet store owner.

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During the dinner, ideas and drinks were flowing, Amelia was taking notes, and everyone was adding information and insight. A plan was really forming for the launch of her facility.

“This is really incredible — I could not be happier with everything happening here,” Amelia said. “I do have a question: Can anyone suggest software to book appointments?”

“Oh that’s easy,” Mark chimed in, “We worked with 321Groom when they were launching, and I would really recommend them for that.”

Margaret, who had had a few too many drinks, interrupted: “What? 321Groom is awful, and the owner is a complete idiot! I worked with them on their marketing, and they didn’t do anything they should have. I can’t believe you would recommend them!”

Mark and everyone at the table looked stunned.

“I am surprised you are saying that,” Mark said. “We had nothing but a great experience with them —”
Margaret was leaning over the table and pointing in Mark’s face: “There is no way we are talking about the same person. He was just awful! And their software is full of bugs!”

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Mark, still a bit in shock from Margaret’s outburst, decided to let her have the last word, seeing she may have had too many drinks.

“OK, OK. I am sure we can think of another company,” he said. But he was unimpressed with Margaret’s lack of professionalism, and she didn’t know his relationship with 321Groom.

As the dinner wrapped up, Amelia thought that besides Margaret’s outburst, the evening had been a success.
The next morning Amelia met Mark for coffee.

“Hi, Mark,” she said. “Thanks again for coming last night and for all your wonderful feedback and information!”

“Hi, Amelia. You are definitely onto a great start, I am happy to be part of it,” Mark said. “I will say, though, last night was great until your marketing person started jumping all over me. I thought her reaction was really inappropriate and unprofessional. You may not know, but we were backers of 321Groom.”

Amelia felt her face flush.

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“I didn’t realize that,” she said. “I apologize for Margaret’s outburst.”

“Well, you may want to think about whether you should keep her on your team. If she is talking that way about a past client, what is she going to say about your business in the future?”

“She came highly recommended,” Amelia said. “I will say, though, it did bother me that she had so many drinks at a business event.”

“Yeah, she didn’t seem to slow down in that regard,” said Mark.

After Mark left the coffee shop, Amelia was feeling unsure of how she should handle the situation.

The Big Questions

  • Is there a way Amelia can smooth things over between her biggest investor and the person tapped to handle her marketing?
  • Should Amelia be worried about — or say anything to her — about Margaret’s drinking?
  • What can Amelia do to ensure the friction does not imperil her new business?

Expanded Real Deal Responses

Dion L. Minneapolis, MN

Let her go. When people show you who they are, believe them.

Terri E. Nature’s Pet Market, Salem, OR

I’d sit down with Margaret and acknowledge her strong opinion and outburst. I’d ask her what she was thinking when she made those statements, listen and ask more questions to get to what she has to say without the anger involved. She really may have something important to contribute, but no one is going to hear it with all the emotions up front. Get to the facts. I’d expect you’d learn a lot about how her mind works and whether she’d continue to be a valued team member or not. Either way you need to understand.

Frank F. Farmingdale, NJ

If I were Amelia, the question I would always ask is, “What’s best for my business?” I would also expect that my experts would think in the same spirit. Just because Mark is a silent partner doesn’t necessarily mean that that software will be the best choice for Amelia’s startup. In addition, Margaret needs to have more professionalism in regard to her excessive drinking at any event while representing your company. Also, her outbursts were not in the best interests of the team dynamics. Ultimately, Amelia will have to decide strictly on the merits of the software to determine whether it meets most of her requirements when compared to alternatives available. The priority of all decisions should be what’s in the best interest for Amelia’s company, which necessitates putting aside any and all outside biases and agendas.

Sandy H. Watkins, MN

Yes, there is always work to do to smooth tough conversations. First, she could reconnect with Mark and eloquently tell him that she is concerned with the potential friction that the prior evening’s discussion created. Mark seems to be very business-savvy and emotionally intelligent. Ask him whether this may affect any potential of working together and mention his invaluable contribution to the vision. Likely, Mark will give suggestions on how to fix any residual — and there may not be any. As far as Margaret, it would be wise for Amelia to have a candid, yet professional, chat as soon as possible. We always want to address conflict at the onset. Amelia could have a written and simple list of expectations for professionals she hires to represent her brand and company. Amelia should bravely tell Margaret that her excessive drinking at the dinner was inappropriate timing and out of context. Next time, boundaries of a few-drink maximum might be in order. I’d conclude by asking Margaret how she foresees this situation being resolved.

Kelly C. Bagdad, KY

Amelia should handle it face-to-face with a non-alcoholic meeting with both Mark and Margaret and discuss the issues at hand in order to come to a conclusion on working together in the future. She should ask Margaret beforehand to bring facts in on the 321 company and any others she would recommend. They can then hash it out and decide what will work best for Amelia’s company. And also Amelia may have to be the mediator in order to keep things calm and to be sure they will be able to work together going forward.

Carlos C. Upland, CA

Margaret acted in a very unprofessional manner. I would be worried about continuing to work with her. There is more at issue here than just the drinking. It appears that Amelia did not do enough research before hiring Margaret.

Wendy M. Emerald Isle, NC

Since the friction was largely due to the choice Margaret made to consume too much alcohol, the onus is on her to smooth things between everyone. If she cannot, or will not own up to her unprofessional behavior and apologize to Mark and Amelia for her outburst, Amelia is better off replacing her.

Ruth M. New York, NY

If Margaret is a marketing person, surely this outburst was inappropriate? Sadly, drinking can interfere with the way we handle things. Perhaps Amelia should find out how much she drinks regularly and then read October 2018 PETS+ about how to handle difficult conversations. Is this the right person for her?

Kristina R. Falls Church, VA

Good for Ameila to get a board together to help. With that said boards are advisory. If she is the 51-percent holder in this situation, then she should do what she feels is best for her, not the others. I understand that Mark is an investor and it would be hard to lose him, but if he knows how much she needs his investment, he could very well be the one to watch out for. Margaret, appeared to be drunk, lost her guard and blurted out her true feelings. But, she was drunk, maybe next meeting, don’t have it around booze. If Margaret has a good reputation, I would not say anything, chalk it up to the booze. But I would watch for other unsolicited outbursts. Friction is normal between people. We are all different, thankfully. If you bring in a board you have to know that each member will have opinions, and just like armpits, some stink. She needs to be the leader and have the last word. It is her business.

Danny B. Sarasota, FL

Amelia is drowning in drama after her first get together two months BEFORE Day 1. She should can Amelia, not judge her booze issue. Amelia will make the connection sooner or later. Mark had no business predicting the future or even bringing up the silent partner handcuffs. He needs to go too. She should open the business and start working 80-hour weeks. She will learn. If she needs all this hand-holding this early, she should just work for someone else who will tell her what to do and pay her, rather than her paying someone to tell her what to do.

Nancy E. Hassel is founder and president of American Pet Professionals (APP), an award-winning networking and educational organization dedicated to helping pet entrepreneurs, businesses and animal rescues to grow, work together and unite the pet industry. Contact her at nancy@americanpetprofessionals.com.

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Real Deal

When a Video of a Day Care’s Staff Member Dragging a Dog Goes Viral, the Owners Are Left Wondering How to Regain Their Clients’ Trust

This is the case of the abusive employee.

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WHAT ARE WE GOING to do? This is a nightmare. How can we recover from this?” Tara said to her husband, Tony, with tears in her eyes. Together, they owned a new doggie day care, grooming and boarding facility. Hosting events, caring for pets in their community and growing their business in less than a year have been what Tara always dreamed of.

ABOUT REAL DEAL

Real Deal is a fictional scenario designed to read like real-life business events. The businesses and people mentioned in this story should not be confused with actual pet businesses and people.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nancy E. Hassel is founder and president of American Pet Professionals (APP), an award-winning networking and educational organization dedicated to helping pet entrepreneurs, businesses and animal rescues to grow, work together and unite the pet industry. Contact her at . nancy@americanpetprofessionals.com

Filled with luxury pet products in the retail area, the best flooring for dogs to romp around on in the day care, Posh Paws even had temperature-controlled, filtered air in the boarding area, a security system and cameras their pet parent clients can access at any time to check in on their dogs. Tony wanted it to be the best in their area for anyone bringing their dogs for day care, boarding or grooming. It was an expensive endeavor, but worth it to him to cater and pamper the pets coming there.

In a popular pet parent group on social media in their area, a video surfaced from their own cameras of a newer employee violently grabbing a dog by the scruff of its neck, shoving it and dragging the dog out of the day care area.
Within minutes of the video posting, reactions of pet parents in the group ranged from calling for them to shut down, to violent actions against the employee, to notifying the media and saying they would never ever go to that business again.

Hundreds of comments and shares of the video made it go viral locally.

“I think we need to consult with our lawyers and a crisis management team,” Tony said. “We have taken necessary steps: firing Adam and responding on social media, being honest with the dog’s owners, providing veterinary care. … I don’t know what else we can do.”

“We can’t afford lawyers or a crisis management team,” Tara said. “I am beyond devastated. You know how hard I have worked toward this and how crushed I am that anyone we brought here and gave a job to would do anything like this. That dog didn’t deserve anything but love.”

Tony put his head down into his hands, sighed and said, “We have to be proactive. You know I am devastated too — I am heartbroken anyone in our facility that we trained and trusted would ever do this to any of our clients.They are like family to us, like our own dogs.”

The next day, Tara and Tony arrived to a dozen or so people outside of their building with signs and chanting loudly, “Animal abusers — shut them down, shut them down!”

As they walked inside Tara immediately burst into tears, then she ran into the bathroom.

Tony walked over to front desk, picked up the phone to call his business adviser. “Hi, yeah … no we are not OK. Did you see the — you can hear that? Protestors outside. I am not sure what to do. … OK, OK. Thank you.”

Knocking on the bathroom door, he said to Tara, “Ron is on his way over. We need him. I don’t care what the fee is. We can’t operate under these circumstances. We need help.”

Tara walked out and nodded to him, wiping tears away from her eyes and walked to the day care area to speak to a few of the employees who were already there.

Tony went over to the front desk and checked the voicemails. There were about 10 messages from boarding and grooming clients canceling. Checking their email and mobile app signup, another eight people canceled their appointments.

The Big Questions

  • What next steps should Tony and Tara take to try and recuperate from this?
  • How can bringing in a lawyer or crisis team help?
  • Besides firing the employee, what actions should be taken against their former employee?
Sarah E.
Lapeer, MI

What is most important is to be transparent with the current customers/public to show their sincerity, professionalism and that they have taken action. People can be understanding. So communicate that the employee’s action was done to protect other dogs — or that the employee violated standards of conduct and is no longer with the company, and immediate in-depth re-training will be conducted with the staff. Honesty and integrity are really the best course of action. This should be communicated via a letter on their website, social media and possibly an ad in the local paper. Also a personal phone call to the company’s current customers to prevent further business loss and to regain trust from those who canceled appointments.

Dawn T.
Windermere, Florida

Tony and Tara should contact the original dog’s owner, make sure that the dog is OK and they are OK. If not, provide assistance. Open up to the public about the incident after speaking with the dog’s owner(s). Let them know what actions, such as firing the employee, re-training of current employees and possibly another open house to re-introduce, show the dedication to the community and their pets. If not, then seek a crisis team and lawyer.

Kristina R.
Falls Church, VA

The power of social media is a wonderful yet deadly tool. Several years ago, I had a similar situation. I went LIVE and talked to social media. I told how we dealt with the employee and that he would never work in the pet industry again. We talked about how we vetted our staff and that some people can hide their true selves. We talked about transparency and coming in any time. We also talked about our reputation with each person who has used us and know who we are. They know our passion and dedication to the animals. I think it helped being up in front of the situation, answering questions and being honest.

Frank F.
Farmingdale, NJ

It is best that the message comes from the owners of the day care. The message should be simple: That this is not who we are and that we never have and never will tolerate that type of behavior. I would express that the employee involved has been terminated, and we are readdressing with our staff the protocols we expect to be followed in the handling of our clients’ family members. In lieu of a lawyer or a crisis team, I would instead opt to solicit the support of those customers still committed to our company’s mission and ask that they verbalize their support on various social media platforms. The idea is to put the incident behind you as soon as possible. I believe no other action should be taken against the employee other than immediate termination.

Paula G.
Muskego, WI

This will take a bit to recuperate from, but they can rebuild trust. One of the ways to rebuild the trust is to be open and honest. Explain that you fired the employee and are doing everything you can to make sure this former employee cannot do this again. If there are laws in the state against animal abuse, then I would charge him so he could never get a job in the pet industry again. Contact customers. Most will understand that this was an isolated case and that you have taken care of it. Most of the social media posts are probably not from customers. Remind customers that you want the best for their pets and that there are security cameras pet parent clients can access at any time to check in on their dogs.

Danny B.
Sarasota, FL

Do not hire your own employees unless they have a local track record of two years. Fire the idiot publicly.

Oshi S.
Conover, NC

I have worked with animals for over 20 years, and, truthfully, it takes a lot of patience. Not everyone is cut out to work with animals. That’s why it’s very important to screen your potential employees. I think it is important to be truthful with your clients about dog fights. It happens, and often it’s not easy to break it up. As for that employee, he should be reprimanded and questioned.

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. pet business serving the public, you’re invited to join the PETS+ Brain Squad. Take one five-minute quiz a month, and you’ll get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting the pet industry. Sign up here.

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Real Deal

Word of a Massive Chain’s Intentions to Build Nearby Has the Local Pet Store Owners Worried

What should they do? Here are your thoughts.

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IN A SMALL BUT artsy rural community in Wisconsin, news of a big-box store potentially opening its doors in 2020, has been spreading like wildfire among local business owners. Currently, downtown has a Main Street dotted with retail stores, restaurants, a coffee shop, an art studio — and the only pet store and grooming location for many miles.

ABOUT REAL DEAL

Real Deal is a fictional scenario designed to read like real-life business events. The businesses and people mentioned in this story should not be confused with actual pet businesses and people.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nancy E. Hassel is founder and president of American Pet Professionals (APP), an award-winning networking and educational organization dedicated to helping pet entrepreneurs, businesses and animal rescues to grow, work together and unite the pet industry. Contact her at . nancy@americanpetprofessionals.com

PawPaws has been in the town for about 15 years, and for the last four years Mike and Tom have owned the store. They were locals who moved out of town to pursue big-city careers, and after moving back home, they bought the store and the building. Now business-savvy pet parents, they knew they could make the local pet store even better. They kept the store aesthetic with the rural, artsy, small-town vibe while offering fantastic customer service.

“Tom, you know we have to fight this. I know our town is small, but this is going to kill our downtown, and we are going to lose customers,” Mike said, tossing aside a postcard announcing a Chamber of Commerce meeting to discuss the big-box store. “It’s bad enough that locals are shopping online — you know I see those delivery boxes.”

“OK, you know this topic is super important to me, but we have to concentrate on the Groomathon that is happening this weekend,” Tom said as he was unpacking grooming supplies. The Groomathon was an event they did every six months to wash, groom and nail-trim the local municipal animal shelter pets to help them get adopted.

“Yes, but while we are unloading we need to discuss this so we can get the Chamber of Commerce fully involved,” Mike said. “You know they are not up to speed on these things, sadly.”

“But isn’t it just a proposal within the town and not something that is set in stone?” Tom said. “I guess we will can really see if anyone else in the Chamber can get together with us to fight this.”

“Now that’s more like it!” Mike said excitedly. “They don’t carry all the same pet products or food we do, but it would be way too close for comfort after we have worked so hard the last few years here.”

The following week at their local Chamber meeting, Mike brought up the big-box store. “So who will help put together a petition to stop the mega-mart from landing in our backyard?”

A few grumbles and only a couple hands went up.

“Really, no one here is as worried about this as we are?” Mike said.

“It is going to add a lot of much-needed jobs in our county,” a tax preparation business owner chimed in. “So would it really be that bad?”

“What about our downtown? If that mega-mart comes in, a lot of people are just going to go there, and stop shopping at my boutique!” a gift shop owner said.

“I don’t know. It seems like it would add some convenience to our area, I don’t think it will affect our businesses in the way you both are worried about,” said a local bank owner, who was a big supporter of the project. “It will be about 10 minutes from the downtown.”

Mike sighed, looked at Tom, shaking his head, and said, “Clearly, we have a lot of work to do.”

The Big Questions

  • What should Mike and Tom do to show their other area business owners the potential negative impact the big-box store could have?
  • In addition to a petition, what other avenues should they look into to stop the box store from landing in their backyard?
  • How can they keep their business going strong if the big-box store gets approved?
Janet M
Rockledge, FL

We have big-box stores within a 5- to 7-mile radius. If Mike and Tom’s pet store offers high-end food, your customer will not be shopping for food there. You offer grooming services, which will help keep you going and have those customers coming back to you. Up your game and always be ahead of the curve. Offer items and services no box store can compare to. Customer service will be your best friend.

Nancy G.
Fredericksburg, VA

What other people are doing is none of your business. If you’re focusing on someone else’s business, your energy and time are taken away from your own. Focus on your business, and your business will thrive.

Frank F.
Farmingdale NJ

I believe that their time and efforts would be better spent on how to make their business stronger and more appealing to their existing customer base. I am also a firm believer in the free market for everyone. Both big-box and e-commerce should have the same rights as I do to compete. It is ultimately to the benefit of the consumer that these choices are available. Unfortunately, some retailers think that they are entitled to calling certain products, territories or demographics as “theirs,” and feel they are also entitled to make a certain margin on those variables. In actuality, the only entitlement that any of us should demand is the right to try and succeed. It is always to the detriment of the consumer if we ever take the position that we are entitled to succeed. As business owners, we inherently must be willing to assume that risk of uncertainty every day. If I can’t be relevant enough to the consumer, then my company doesn’t deserve to exist in the marketplace. For those reasons, for the last 32 years I have said to big boxes, “Welcome … let’s go to war!”

Wendy M.
Moore, OK

Do what sets you apart best! Give personal customer service. Not only in-store, but on your website, fun emails, interactive Facebook posts, encouraging participation. Have a great and varied selection of products that people want, and need — especially those disposable items that make them come back for more. Send your customers’ animals birthday cards to come in for a treat and discount. Do monthly or quarterly events … fun things that people can bring their pets to. All of the personal touches that you can provide will make a big difference in bringing your customers back.

Joyce M.
Faribault, MN

My store was the only full-line pet store until 10 years ago. [A major pet chain] decided to come on the recommendation of our Chamber of Commerce. According to a reliable source, they were told Faribault didn’t have a pet store. The local newspaper wrote an article stating there would now be a place in town to get all your pet supplies without a trip to the Twin Cities. I asked the Chamber — that I was a member of — to please write an article alluding to the fact that there would be two places to shop with even more variety. They said they would and then conveniently forgot. I don’t think PawPaws can stop them from coming, but I think they will be OK if they have a good, loyal customer base.

Rachel D.
Littleton, CO

If they are coming, you cannot stop it. So, plan ahead. Isn’t it great to know you have choices and lead time to prepare? Big-box stores have lots of turnover, so now is the time to build up the best staff you can have. Create learning opportunities for knowledgeable staff, better incentives, staff values and teamwork.What do they offer to potential clients? Fast in/out, I think. So, have a way to notice those clients who want to be fast about it versus chatting away. They’re there, you and your staff just need to pay attention. Finally, perception is reality. I don’t share this often, just now, in this awesome magazine. If you believe and act as though you have abundance in business, you will. Clean store, happy clients, friendly and knowledgeable staff and never downtime. Plan events during the known slow time, and you’ll never feel lacking. Never have the ‘lack of’ attitude, and you’ll always win! Good luck. You’ve got this!

What’s the Brain Squad?

If you’re the owner or top manager of a U.S. pet business serving the public, you’re invited to join the PETS+ Brain Squad. Take one five-minute quiz a month, and you’ll get a free t-shirt, be featured prominently in this magazine, and make your voice heard on key issues affecting the pet industry. Sign up here.

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Real Deal

The Recipient of a Fundraiser Disputes the Sum Raised by a Business and Suggests the Non Profit Is Owed $500 More

Here are your thoughts.

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DYANNA WAS FINALIZING the figures of the recent Doggie Festival fundraiser she hosted for a nonprofit that works with their city’s shelter.

This was Dyanna’s first event held at her dog-training facility. The spring weather was perfect, as their event had both indoor and outdoor festivities. Outside, they hosted a hilarious Dachshund race and beginner’s agility tryout in the grassy area of her training center. Inside, there were vendors, training demos, a veterinarian providing dog health care tips, a pet portrait artist and adoptable dogs from the shelter.

ABOUT REAL DEAL

Real Deal is a fictional scenario designed to read like real-life business events. The businesses and people mentioned in this story should not be confused with actual pet businesses and people.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nancy E. Hassel is founder and president of American Pet Professionals (APP), an award-winning networking and educational organization dedicated to helping pet entrepreneurs, businesses and animal rescues to grow, work together and unite the pet industry. Contact her at . nancy@americanpetprofessionals.com

Dyanna, her employees and trainers were thrilled with the success of the event. They had 200 people and dogs show up, and all of their vendors said they would be back for the next event.

They raised $2,000 for the nonprofit, which Dyanna knew would be put to good use for the dogs at the shelter. Her costs to promote the event, food and refreshments, rentals chairs and tables, supplies, paying her employees and trainers added up to just under $3,500. A few monetary sponsors and vendor fees helped offset that, and her total outlay ended up at $1,500.

“Even though our costs were a bit more, I know we already landed new clients and potential new clients from this one event. But what really makes me happy is that we raised so much for the rescue and shelter,” Dyanna said to her manager, Susan.

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Susan just finished double-checking the numbers, since they wanted to be accurate before writing the check.

“Keeping the cost at $10 per person really worked, raising $2,000 for the rescue,” Susan said. “I got the same figures you did.”

Susan handed Dyanna the calculator and paperwork. “I think it is safe to say we can contact Rosa and let her know she can come pick up the check for her org.”

“Remember, we want to take a picture of us handing it to her, so we can send to the local papers and pet bloggers that were here,” Dyanna said. “And since this was our first event, I think next year we can be even bigger and raise more for them!”

A few days later, Rosa stopped by to pick up the check, and they all took pictures. Rosa was very grateful and thanked them over and over in person.

About two weeks later, Dyanna was checking her email and yelled out: “Susan! You have to come in here and read this … I am … I am dumbfounded!”

“I’m coming, I’m coming! What is it?” Susan said, out of breath. She read the email, “Wait, let me see that!” She grabbed the laptop and read aloud:

“Dyanna, I wanted to thank you again so much for all you did for our organization and for the donation. I really don’t know how to say this, but according to your calculations you said 200 people were there, which is where you came up with the $2,000, but our volunteers counted that 250 people were there. Wouldn’t that then equal $2,500 for us? You said the door fee went to us, is that correct? Maybe we can all go over the expenses again together, I know you showed me the other day, but I didn’t get to really digest it all.

“Looking forward to your response. Rosa”

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“What? What is she talking about? I am at a loss for words!” Susan exclaimed as she shook her head at Dyanna, “The nerve!”

“How do I … What do I do? We worked so hard to make this a great event and gave them $2,000! I don’t even know how to … to respond to this,” Dyanna said, as her hands trembled.

The Big Questions

  • How should Dyanna respond to Rosa’s email?
  • What is the best way to handle a situation like this to keep both parties on friendly terms?

Expanded Real Deal Responses

Karen C.Delavan, WI

We’ve done our share of fundraising, and one thing that is a must is to have procedures in place for all aspects of the event. I can see where it would be very easy for a head count to be off: Were staff and volunteers there who didn’t pay the door fee? Were there free tickets to the event that would increase the head count but not the total collected? Simple things like wristbands can help identify who paid and who didn’t. Having great communication between the host and the organization — before, during and after — is critical. To have a misunderstanding can tarnish the good intentions of the event and hurt the future of the relationship.

Wendy T.Moore, OK

My first thought was that if it was a gated event, then the count would have been correct. Maybe the volunteers over-counted if they were just counting the crowd? And if that is the amount collected, then there shouldn’t be a question. If I were to respond, I think I would kindly review the numbers, stating that according to our records, these are the numbers from the event, this is how much was collected, and this is the reason why the check amount was what it was. Absolutely do not get defensive, but be factual and state what a pleasure it was to work with them.

Krista L.Wolcott & West Hartford, CT

I had a similar experience too! Couldn’t believe that the nonprofit would look a gift horse in the mouth! I was exhausted from the work and the expense to have it, but proud and excited for the positive response. Giving back to the community is a necessity for any successful business. From their point of view, I think that they have every right to ask for validation. But there are plenty out there that need the help and would be appreciative of ANY amount raised. Not all nonprofits are the same! To prove integrity and correct any errors, be transparent and cross-reference their info with yours. What their people said may not be the correct count. Was it per dog? Per person? There’s a difference that they may not be clear on. Keep record of all attendees, (proof of vaccines were required) then share that list with the person to confirm the amount. Show them your expenses too! Don’t let it keep you from future fundraising efforts.

Alan F.Sag Harbor, NY

Don’t answer from a defensive position. If you become adversarial, you might end up undoing the good and might even have a negative light on the event and in the community. Double-check how you did your count, then ask to meet with them to reconcile the counts. Do not get into any discussions by email, text or phone. I don’t know how well you know the shelter, but I would ask around to see if anything like this ever happened before. In 15 years of doing events like this, the shelters never questioned what we raised.

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Janice A.Bakersfield, CA

If this is how the organization operates, I would think twice about doing another fundraiser for them.

James W.West Palm Beach, FL

Dyanna and Susan should go over the figures once more with fresh eyes and make sure there isn’t something they overlooked. Assuming that everything again checks out, reply to Rosa: “Rosa, What a great event! We met our goals and successfully collected a $10 door fee from 200 people, totaling $2,000. Dyanna.” That is all I would say. The goal is to deescalate the situation and wrap this up ASAP. There are many worthy nonprofits. Depending on how Rosa answers and how Dyanna and Susan feel about her asking for additional funds (assuming they didn’t make a mistake), they may want to assist a different nonprofit the following year. I would move on.

Kimberly B.Salem, MA

First, take a day to cool off, so there is no emotional content to the response. Then, send the email acknowledging Rosa’s concerns, but also being direct in that her numbers were 200, and not 250. Follow that with a sentence reviewing how happy she was to sponsor the event and raise the money for such a great cause, and looks forward to doing it again. Finally, the email should end by requesting a meeting, so Dyanna can present her data to Rosa. This would help to ensure friendly terms continue. Too many emails back and forth can lead to misunderstandings. At the end of the meeting, they may agree to disagree at the final number and develop joint plans on how to best work jointly in the future to ensure this disagreement does not happen again.

Christine D.Dedham, MA

The only true count on the day comes from when the visitors were checked in initially. You had that “count”. Any “volunteers” sent by the shelter would have been too busy “volunteering” to carefully count each person only once. They also did not know how many “volunteers” (who should not be counted) you had on site to work this event, too.

Perhaps they also counted the vendors. It is a sad tribute to our times that people look to find fault with things and then think they can “email” something that sends a knife through your heart. I feel your pain in having to deal with this person.

Even recounting to this person all of the above will not totally make her happy.

Good luck to you from someone who thought she had seen it all after 40 plus years in my own pet related business. I love my business but occasionally something happens that just makes me sad. Your experience is one of those times.

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