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NY State Considers Banning Sale of Dogs, Cats, Rabbits in Pet Stores

The legislation passed the state legislature’s agriculture committees.

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New York state legislators are considering a potential ban on the sale of cats, dogs and rabbit in pet stores.

The measure has won the approval of the state Senate and Assembly agriculture committees, the Democrat & Chronicle reports.

“With so many good animals in need of rescue, there is no need for puppy mills that abuse animals to supply pet stores,” said Senate Deputy Leader Michael Gianaris. “Our four-legged companions should be treated with respect, not like commodities. I am pleased this important proposal continues to build momentum in the legislature.”

The Democrat & Chronicle reports reports that the bill “would end so-called puppy mills and instead put a focus on saving rescue animals.”

The legislation has been considered in Albany before, but has always stalled. Animal right organizations have advocated for the bill.

Mike Bober, president and CEO of the Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council, said statewide pet sale bans, including one currently being considered in New York State, “are an unproven and misdirected reaction to well-intended animal health and safety concerns.”

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“These misguided bans have no effect on irresponsible and illegal breeders who put profit before pet care; they punish responsible and regulated breeders and put locally owned pet stores out of business,” he said. “Pet stores are a transparent source that provides legal protections for both animals and consumers and eliminating them will put families at risk of fraud and heartache by driving them to the underground, unregulated market for pets that has surged in recent years.

“Under current law, licensed breeders that partner with local pet stores are the only USDA-
regulated and -inspected pet providers. Rather than instituting senseless pet sale bans that harm responsible breeders and pet store owners, PIJAC believes that the most accountable way to ensure companion animal well-being is to go after bad breeders by focusing resources on strengthening national standards set by the USDA and vigorously enforcing them. That’s something we can all agree on.”

Read more at the Democrat & Chronicle

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