Connect with us

Ask PETS+

Harness the Over-Achiever, Sell Your Business to Prospective Employees, and Get Your Customers to Follow Your Move

Ever consider systems and processes that everyone abides by?

mm

Published

on

What to do with the over-achieving employee? I have one such person — my newest hire — who puts the rest of the staff in the uncomfortable position of “how do we keep up with her? She’s kicking our ass.”

On the surface, that seems like a good problem to have, but if no one can keep up, it can strain relations and tank morale all around. Nancy Hassel of American Pet Professionals has a question to throw back at you: “Do you have systems and processes in place already that everyone abides by?” she wonders. “If not, it may be time to start, so everyone is on a level playing field. I would try roping in some of that energy of the new hire to see if she inspires new ideas and inspiration for your business. Bring everyone together for team meetings. Maybe her ass-kicking has been needed, and you’re all just not used to it! Or, maybe the new employee may not be a fit for your business as she is disrupting your status quo.”

I’m moving my store to a new location about 25 miles away. What are some ways to get my customers to follow me?

Have no fear — this is actually a great marketing opportunity because it gives you a valid reason to communicate with your existing clientele, as well as prospective customers. Start getting out the news months before the move. “It is important to communicate why you are moving — a better location, a bigger location, a more convenient location, you purchased a building,” says James Porte of the Porte Marketing Group. Place a small sign in your existing store announcing the move. You can also mention it on your business cards, invoices and other mediums. A direct mail-out is critical, says Porte, adding that the more memorable way you can communicate this, the better the chance it will be remembered. “I once saw a pack of playing cards imprinted with a business’s name that was packaged in a die-cut paper moving truck as a self-mailer. It was awesome!” Next, get in touch with the local newspaper and tell them about the move, and in particular what you’re bringing to the market — possibly exposure to the finest independent pet-food makers or a higher level of pet care. As the day nears, get on the phone. “Contacting each and every customer by phone to let them know you are moving is by far the most effective way,” Porte says. Finally, a grand opening will help get your old customers to the new store so “they can experience what you have done that is improved and of greater benefit to the customer,” he says. And don’t worry about overdoing the message. This is one time when repetitive communication is necessary, particularly to your existing customers.

What kind of discount should I give my bookkeeper on my merchandise, given that she knows exactly how much I paid for it?

We’d say very little. Your bookkeeper should be a pro who understands how discounts impact your bottom line. If she asks for a “good price,” offer her the employee discount or trade merchandise for her services. And to keep it fair for both parties, trade full retail for full retail. Unless your bookkeeper is willing to discount her services, you should not feel obliged to cut the price of her purchases.

If I join other retailers in a group marketing effort, am I responsible if their advertising is misleading? What about the advertising of a brand name item I carry in my store?

Wherever your name or store is represented, you have responsibilities. If you are part of a group advertisement, adding your logo to a prepared ad (as in co-op advertising) or endorsing a product, you have the obligation to do your homework to ensure the ad is not misleading. Know whom you’re dealing with and ensure you know where and how your name/logo are being used.

What’s a good way to sell our company to prospective employees?

One of the most valuable skills a businessperson can have is the ability to recruit and retain good people, and it all starts with the job posting. “When the right people read your ad, their hearts will whisper, ‘These people are like me, and I am like them,’” says Roy H. Williams, author of The Wizard of Ads. Bullet-point what the job entails and also the benefits, but the core message of your ad should be about who you are as a company, your reputation and your goals. The best salespeople often don’t have a sales background, so go easy on the requirements. Your message should be more about culture than qualifications.

Advertisement

Since launching in 2017, PETS+ has won 16 major international journalism awards for its publication and website. Contact PETS+'s editors at editor@petsplusmag.com.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Subscribe


BULLETINS

Get the most important news
and business ideas from PETS+.

Instagram

This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Error: No posts found.

Make sure this account has posts available on instagram.com.

Most Popular