Connect with us

Columns

6 Simple Steps to Getting Great Online Reviews

Learn the know-how of excellent online reviews.

mm

Published

on

MOST CUSTOMERS CHECK OUT online reviews to see how happy (or ticked off) your customers are and to find out what your product or service is really like before buying. And this spells a huge opportunity. According to Matt Frary writing in Forbes, “Customers spend 31 percent more with a business that has excellent reviews.”
It’s simple: Beyond building a loyal base of these ideal clients, thrilled customers are the folks who can help you attract even more clients to your business and get them to spend more. In its simplest form, this happens through online reviews. But how?

Here are six steps:

1. Create a short customer satisfaction survey. This gives you valuable insight into what your customers liked (or didn’t) about their experience or your products or services. It also helps you understand who’s the happiest about your business and what they’re happy about. Doing this doesn’t have to be hard. Try a 10-question Google Survey.

2. Don’t let your own fear drive your questions. Imposter syndrome is real. Waaaaaaaay too many petpreneurs pre-judge their own offerings, which can shade your survey questions and create a self-fulfilling prophecy. For example, someone may not think anything about your price point … until you ask whether it’s “too expensive.” Suddenly, to them, it is because you’ve suggested it is. Instead of asking about price or other things you may be afraid to hear, focus on basics like the value, quality and overall experience of working with you. Give them space for a one- to five-star rating and an open-comment box to describe why they feel this way. This helps you get their deeper perceptions without coloring it for them.

3. Automatically trigger your survey after purchase. Consider enclosing a request for survey participation on your receipts. And never underestimate the value of a good incentive for survey participation.

4. Approach your happiest clients about doing a review. Once the surveys start rolling in, create a second email or outreach that goes out only to the happiest customers. (Some studies suggest that customers believe reviews more readily if not all of them are perfect, so consider reaching out to those who gave you three-plus star ratings instead of just five-star reviews.) The gist is the same for everyone: You’re asking those most satisfied with your offering to help you help other pet guardians by leaving a review.

Advertisement

5. Make it easy and tell them where to go. Satisfied customers may have goodwill built up toward you, but they’re busy too. Being respectful of their time can help you get far. Make reviewing you take as little time as possible by including some direct quotes from their survey (or even a full copy of it) that they can copy and paste from. Also, be sure to let them know which social review platform you’d like them to use. Give them one to three choices and link directly to each for them.

6. Say thank you. They feel recognized, and it ensures they’ll keep coming back to you time and time again.

Jane Harrell is president of ’cause Digital Marketing, co-owner of Working With Dog and has spent the last 16 years working with pet businesses to find simple, scalable marketing solutions that work so they can focus on what matters most — helping pets and the people who care about them.

Advertisement

FEATURED VIDEO

PETS+ Wellness Summit

Let the PETS+ Wellness Summit Boost Your Wellness Business

This October, PETS+ is hosting its first-ever education and buying summit, with a laser focus on one of the most exciting, fastest-growing areas of the pet business — wellness. The PETS+ Wellness Summit will be held Oct. 1-2 in Rosemont, IL, just outside Chicago and minutes away from O'Hare International Airport. Watch the video to see how you'll boost your wellness business at the event.

FREE REGISTRATION! Sign up for the Summit today at petsplusmag.com/register

Promoted Headlines

Shawna Schuh

Control or Trust? The Two Don’t Have to Be Mutually Exclusive

How do we put our trust in people we don’t know well?

Published

on

A MAN I RECENTLY met invited me to go for a cruise behind him on his 1,000-pound touring Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

This would be the first time I did something like this, and the trip was a big loop over to the Oregon coast over two-lane winding roads and through dense forests and gorgeous landscape.

In a car it’s great, and I thought on the back of a motorcycle it would be a wonderful adventure.

Podcast: Travel Deals for the Pet Pro on the Latest “Behind the Pages”
Behind the Pages

Podcast: Travel Deals for the Pet Pro on the Latest “Behind the Pages”

Podcast: Meet the Pet Product Entrepreneur Who Turned Down Shark Tank’s Investors
Behind the Pages

Podcast: Meet the Pet Product Entrepreneur Who Turned Down Shark Tank’s Investors

Podcast: How to Keep Your Millennial Employees Happy at Work
Behind the Pages

Podcast: How to Keep Your Millennial Employees Happy at Work

This article is about the difference between control and trust, something that I grappled with the minute he zipped me into leather chaps, and a high-tech helmet we could converse through while riding. He instructed me about the perils of wiggling, sudden movements and keeping balanced.

I realized I had absolutely no control over this situation.

I was a passenger, extra weight on an already heavy bike, and I could pose a challenge that could end both of our lives.

Yes, I still got on.

When you are hiring someone or when you are taking on a new vendor or when you agree to advertise, how do you feel? Like you want to control the outcome, or that you will trust the process?

This is a great question to ask yourself. Believe me, I was asking myself this exact question a variety of times over the five hours we did the loop.

“Am I feeling anxious because I’m not driving this? Because I don’t have control of the bike?” My answer was: “That isn’t it. I don’t have control of planes, trains or autos I’m a passenger in.”

“Am I feeling anxious because I don’t trust this driver?” This I think is the key to a lot of what we do in business. How do we put our trust in people we don’t know well? How do we know that the new hire won’t steal, that the vendor will deliver or treat us fairly, or that the advertising will work?

The truth I realized as we sped around corners, leaning to the side with the wind whipping past us and the engine roaring was: We don’t. We don’t know, and so we have a choice. Trust and move forward, or distrust and keep doing your life and business as you have been.

I also asked myself whether I would have felt better, differently even, if I had been the one driving the Harley? If I had control of the bike? Would that have made me feel better or safer? My answer was no. I am not versed in that. I have never done it.

So if I want to experience more, have more, do more and live fully, I will have to trust others.

It’s the same in business. Those on my team, the people we hire for all those things we need, the places we advertise or things we decide to sponsor. We do it and I’m assuming you do it because if we don’t do it, we are not growing or risking or, maybe, we aren’t really living as fully as we could.

My challenge to you today is this: Who will you trust today? Maybe it’s simply trusting yourself enough to get on the bike and let things unfold as they will. Who knows, it might be one of the best things you’ve done in a while.

Continue Reading

Columns

Free Tools: Use These Apps and Services to Share Your News with the Local Media

All you need are the right tools.

mm

Published

on

WHEN IS THE LAST TIME you hosted an event at your store and were able to share that news with your local newspaper or TV station? For many small pet business owners, the idea of reaching out to your local media sounds daunting, but it doesn’t have to be if you have the right tools.

The next time you have news you want to share, you and your team can use these tools to capture the attention of your local media at no cost.

MailChimp

An email distribution platform like MailChimp is great for both customer communication and for reaching the media. Upload the names and email addresses of your local journalists and TV stations (more about this in a moment) and send them an invite to the next event you’re hosting, or simply share your company news announcements so they know what’s going on at your store. MailChimp is free if your contact list is under 2,000 email addresses. You can schedule emails, and it provides analytics so you can see who is opening your emails.

Old Fashioned Research

To find the contact information for the journalist you want to reach, start by identifying the media outlets that cover news in your area. Visit each website and look for the “contact us” or “newsroom” page. These are typically found at the bottom of the website or on a side menu. For TV stations, look for the general news desk email address. For print, you’ll want to dig a little deeper. In addition to the newsroom email, look for people who write about business news, editors and even photographers.

Google Alerts

Another great way to find journalists in your area is by using Google Alerts. Once set up, Google Alerts will send you an email when a news article mentions one of your keywords. For example, set up a Google Alert for one of your biggest local competitors. You’ll receive an email any time they are mentioned in the news, and this will give you a good idea of which journalists and publications are writing about pet-focused local topics. Add them to your email list in MailChimp and send them news and information about events. Also, set up a Google Alert for your own business so you can stay on top of what the media is saying about you.

SimilarWeb.com

Knowing the audience size of the media you’re reaching out to is key. Make sure the publications you’re pitching have a large enough audience to make it worth your time. SimilarWeb.com is a free tool that our PR agency uses regularly. It allows us to learn the audience size of almost any newspaper, online outlet or blog. Any media you’re pitching should receive at least 5,000 website unique visitors per month.

Grammarly

The last thing you want to do is spell something wrong or use the incorrect form of “their” — yikes! Journalists and TV stations receive loads of emails a day, and they write for a living, so they’re looking for emails that communicate your points clearly and quickly. Download Grammarly, which will help you compose bold, clear, mistake-free emails.

Continue Reading

Columns

The Road to Cha-Ching! Upselling Your Customers Isn’t Salesy, It’s Great Customer Service

How could a retailer not upsell?

mm

Published

on

SPEAKING AT GLOBAL PET EXPO earlier this year about luring customers into your store using old-school marketing techniques, I asked at the end, “Now that you’re successfully luring customers to your store, how many of you upsell to your customers?” In the audience of 90 people, four people raised their hands, and two of those were from the same store. I was a dumbfounded at the lack of response. How could a retailer not upsell?

So, over the next month, I did some secret-shopping to see how upselling and customer service were going in our industry.

Photo of Adorable Service Dogs in Theater Gets Viral Attention (VIDEO)
Headlines

Photo of Adorable Service Dogs in Theater Gets Viral Attention (VIDEO)

Video: Help Customers Understand What Makes Your Pet Business Unique
Jim Ackerman

Video: Help Customers Understand What Makes Your Pet Business Unique

Video: Principles Learned While Traveling That You Can Apply to Your Pet Business
PETS+ LIVE!

Video: Principles Learned While Traveling That You Can Apply to Your Pet Business

One pet store that failed big time was a small chain retail store that also has self-service dog-wash stations. I brought my dog there after a muddy walk in the woods, and I was greeted nicely by one employee — “Hi, here for a bath?” — while paying attention to my dog. “Yes,” peering back to see there was a Husky in the middle bath who the owner was bathing. As I walked to the back of the store, the employee said, “The tub on the right is out of order, but the one of the left works.” But the tub on the left was too low for me to bathe my dog without hurting my back.

So I went back up to the front and said, “I think I am going to come back,” as my dog was wagging and begging for attention. “Oh, OK … your dog is so cute. Can I take a picture of him?” After the picture was taken, and more treats were given to my dog, I said it again, “I think I will come back.” And after a few moments of the employees — all three, including the manager, making a fuss over my dog — I left.

They let me leave the store! There were no other customers in the store. They just lost the sale of the bath — and a dog toy that I always purchase after the bath.

The employees could have educated me about products to solve my muddy dog problem before I walked out the door. How? Simple question: “Can I show you something?” She could have led me over to the aisle where they have products to help clean my dog — bath wipes, sprays, dog towels, even car-seat covers — and explained them to me.

Instead, they were more interested in taking pictures of my dog than helping me (the customer) solve the problem I had (a muddy pup). They could have upsold me products I didn’t know I needed, thus having a better profit than if I just washed my dog … which I wasn’t able to do in the first place.

Fantastic customer service could have been:

  • Offering to call me when the tub was free.
  • Scheduling an appointment for me — even though there is a first-come, first-serve policy. (Make an exception!)
  • Telling me to come a few minutes before they opened, to ensure a tub.
  • Offering to wash the dog for me since the lower tub hurts my back.
  • Asking whether I wanted to pre-pay for the bath, to ensure I would actually come back and bathe my dog. (I haven’t been back since.)

Upselling doesn’t have to be salesy or make you feel uncomfortable, but rather using education to teach customers about the products in your store, which will naturally get them to purchase. We are experts in the industry and know what the products are — but the average pet parent is not that keen on everything we stock in our stores, what they do, how they can be used and so on. Customers leaving without a purchase is obviously not what we want. Providing education about a product, great customer service and informing them how products can be used is more likely to lead to the cha-ching of your cash register.

Continue Reading

Most Popular